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BID-Milton Awards $7,780 in Community Health Grants to Four Quincy Organizations

Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Milton recently awarded community health grants totaling $7,780 to four Quincy organizations that sponsor programs that meet the hospital’s community health priorities.

A $2,000 grant was awarded to EACH, Inc. (Enhance Asian Community on Health) for “Health Empowerment Leverage Program – Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Prevention.” The grant will help fund health education programs that will increase awareness of diabetes and provide “Prevent T-2-A Proven Program to Prevent or Delay Type 2 Diabetes” workshops for the Chinese community.

The City of Quincy’s Department of Planning and Community Development received a community health grant in the amount of $1,990. The grant will help send 250 Quincy Public School students to Holly Hill Organic Farm and conduct farm-connected teacher training and on-site school garden lessons at three schools.

To help prevent falls among seniors, BID-Milton provided a $1,790 grant to Asian American Service Association at Wollaston Senior Center. The grant will help fund the evidence-based, eight-week Matter of Balance program to help seniors over the age of 60 avoid falls which could lead to hospitalizations. The program will be targeted to the Chinese community.

A $2,000 grant was also awarded to the Germantown Neighborhood Center for a “Couch to 5k” wellness program, in collaboration with South Shore Mental Health, which will provide health and wellness education to women from the center while encouraging them to work up to either walking or running 5 kilometers.

“Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Milton believes we have a vital role to play in addressing health needs outside of the hospital, and we are committed to improving the health of our communities,” said Rich Fernandez, president and CEO of the hospital. “These community health grants will provide additional valuable resources to the work already being done as well as fund new programs, particularly those targeting Quincy’s Asian community.”

The $7,780 in grants were funded through BID-Milton’s Community Benefits Program. During the last eight years the hospital has awarded an estimated $95,000 to 37 local non-profit organizations to help support programs that meet the hospital’s community health priorities. A comprehensive community health needs assessment undertaken by the hospital every three years identified the priorities. Current priorities include elder health and well-being, chronic disease, behavioral health and cancer.